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Being a modeller for quite a few years now, I decided to explore the endless possibilities that the world (through internet) offers, and come up with a series of ways of building, modelling and painting fast (but not hastily), to create the worlds I was seeing in history books since I was little. . .If you care to join me. . . This is the place to be! And, I promise you to find the way (or ways)!!

Tuesday, 19 January 2016

Caesar Set H048 The Sea Peoples (the first lot)

Hi Chaps,

As promised, I delivered. Below you will see some photos of my newly painted Sea Peoples from Caesar's set H048 (review). 
As you will notice, I have painted them wearing skirts (?) painted white with red, blue and green linings.

A joy to paint, to be honest, not much details and fiddly parts for this scale. If you're interested for something different, instead of watching Monty Python news report from the Ministry of Silly Walking for a hundreth time, paint some of these fellow instead. 

Off we go: 













Hope you like them.

Another 20 or more to follow. 

Have a nice Tuesday night everyone.

Thanos

8 comments:

  1. Man, look at those abs! Great work on their faces.

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  2. Πολυ καλη δουλεια! Ωραιο Blog εχεις εδω...
    Ελπιζω να βρω το χρονο να το εξερευνησω!!
    Καλη συνεχεια, Γιωργος.

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  3. Excellent work Thanos! Painted some myself but I think yours look better!
    https://peterscave.blogspot.be/2014/11/caesar-h048-sea-people.html

    Greetings
    Peter

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  4. Sea People? That would be the Hyksos invaders of ancient Egypt, the "Shepard Kings," who were in fact pirates. And that is exactly what came to mind the moment I saw these figures. The description of "sea people" clenched it.

    According to Egyptian historian Manetho -

    "These people, whom we have called kings before, and shepherds too, and their descendants," as he says, "held Egypt for five hundred and eleven years. Then," he says, "the kings of Thebes and the other parts of Egypt rose against the shepherds, and a long and terrible war was fought between them."

    Under a king of ours named Timaus (Tutimaeus) God became angry with us, I know not how, and there came, after a surprising manner, men of obscure birth from the east, and had the temerity to invade our country, and easily conquered it by force, as we did not do battle against them. After they had subdued our rulers, they burnt down our cities, and destroyed the temples of the gods, and treated the inhabitants most cruelly; killing some and enslaving their wives and their children.

    Then they made one of their own king. His name was Salatis; he lived at Memphis, and both the upper and lower regions had to pay tribute to him. He installed garrisons in places that were the most suited for them. His main aim was to make the eastern parts safe, expecting the Assyrians, at the height of their power, to covet his kingdom, and invade it. In the Saite Nome there was a city very proper for this purpose, by the Bubastic arm of the Nile. With regard to a certain theologic notion it was called Avaris. He rebuilt and strengthened this city by surrounding it with walls, and by stationing a large garrison of two hundred and forty thousand armed men there. Salitis came there in the summer, to gather corn in order to pay his soldiers, and to exercise his men, and thus to terrify foreigners.
    After a reign of thirteen years, he was followed by one whose name was Beon, who ruled for for forty-four years. After him reigned Apachnas for thirty-six years and seven months. After him Apophis was king for sixty-one years, followed by Janins for fifty years and one month. After all these Assis reigned during forty-nine years and two months.

    These six were their first kings. They all along waged war against the Egyptians, and wanted to destroy them to the very roots.

    "These people, whom we have called kings before, and shepherds too, and their descendants," as he says, "held Egypt for five hundred and eleven years. Then," he says, "the kings of Thebes and the other parts of Egypt rose against the shepherds, and a long and terrible war was fought between them."

    He says further, "By a king, named Alisphragmuthosis, the shepherds were subdued, and were driven out of the most parts of Egypt and shut up in a place named Avaris, measuring ten thousand acres." Manetho says, "The shepherds had built a wall surrounding this city, which was large and strong, in order to keep all their possessions and plunder in a place of strength.

    Tethmosis, son of Alisphragmuthosis, attempted to take the city by force and by siege with four hundred and eighty thousand men surrounding it. But he despaired of taking the place by siege, and concluded a treaty with them, that they should leave Egypt, and go, without any harm coming to them, wherever they wished. After the conclusion of the treaty they left with their families and chattels, not fewer than two hundred and forty thousand people, and crossed the desert into Syria. Fearing the Assyrians, who dominated over Asia at that time, they built a city in the country which we now call Judea. It was large enough to contain this great number of men and was called Jerusalem.

    http://www.reshafim.org.il/ad/egypt/manetho_hyksos.htm

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